Anaximperator blog

Blogging against alternative cancer treatments

Tag Archives: iscador

With Complements From Boots

complimentsOh my…

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Alternative Medicine and Why It Seems To Work

PlacebosVery rarely have alternative treatments or medication been able to¬†show any¬†therapeutic value. Yet countless people swear by it and are convinced¬†they can’t do without.

The mysterious placebo effect has everything to do with this. But what is it and how does it work? Harriet Hall explains.

Switzerland to insert CAM in the constitution?

CAMOn 17 May 2009 the Swiss people voted in favour of a constitutional article for complementary medicine in a national vote. 67 percent of voters supported the new constitutional article. Switzerland is the first country in Europe to set out in the constitution, authority for the state and constituent states (cantons) to take complementary medicine into consideration in the public health service. Read more of this post

Guide to Alternative Therapies

Thanks Ed! ūüėČ

Have you ever seen the website of Ed Friedlander? He is¬†a pathologist who¬†created the internet’s busiest one-person medical site,¬†with a wealth of information on all kinds of diseases, including cancer.¬†On Mr. Friedlander’s site, we found this information on a number of alternative treatments for cancer. Friedlander has rated the¬†treatments¬†as follows:

  • Confident: the remedy has a plausable mechanism and has been given some basic tests, and/or has solidly passed two good, clear, controlled studies;
  • Optimistic: the remedy makes sense pathophysiologically, and there is at least impressive anecdotal evidence;
  • Doubtful:¬†the anecdotal evidence seemed interesting, but that’s all there was;
  • Pessimistic: it’s understandable¬†why somebody might have thought of this. But if this actually works better than a placebo and a little human kindness, we are all going to have to make some major readjustments in how we think about health and disease. Don’t spend too much money, or get your hopes up.

See also this website, where a pathologist shows that cancer is not caused by the common fungus Candida Albicans

Mistletoe Just For Kissing, Not For Curing Cancer, Says Edzard Ernst

mistletoe_botany_print
Read what Edzard Ernst, professor of complementary medicine at the universities of Exeter and Plymouth, has to tell us about mistletoe.

Most¬†people¬†will be surprised to learn from a case reported in this week’s British Medical Journal (BMJ) of a use for mistletoe (Viscum album) that has nothing to do with Christmas. Some patients with cancer inject themselves with extract of mistletoe in the hope of improving their condition. In continental Europe, at least 30 different mistletoe preparations are available. In Europe, most cancer patients use such extracts, at a total expense of about ¬£30m (‚ā¨45m; $59m) each year, and in Germany the insurance system pays for this treatment.

A Google search (20 November 2006) showed that 145 000 websites promote or mention mistletoe as a treatment for cancer. This much publicity may mean that many cancer patients in the UK will try mistletoe in the future or ask their doctor about it. It is therefore timely to discuss the value of mistletoe as an anticancer drug.

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