Anaximperator blog

Blogging against alternative cancer treatments

Vitamins and cancer – and other ailments

Sometimes life is really simple: just eat your fruit’n veggies, some wholegrain bread, glass of low-fat milk, bit of yoghurt, some fish, some meat, some wine – and bob’s your uncle. No need for supplements, you can spend the money on your weekly bunch of flowers from now on. :-)

http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/588300
and
http://www.sciencebasedmedicine.org/?p=285
http://www.sciencebasedmedicine.org/?p=372
http://www.sciencebasedmedicine.org/?p=188

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20 responses to “Vitamins and cancer – and other ailments

  1. natalie March 19, 2009 at 12:33 am

    “Get nutrients from food. Whole foods are better than dietary supplements.”

    defiantely… trouble is a lot of our food lacks the same amount of nutrients it did say 50 years ago… if you eat right, balanced etc you shouldn’t require vitamin supplements…

    does the average brit/american etc eat like this though?? does over preparing and processing food not damage the nutritional value of the food the majority consume today?

  2. evenarsenicisnatural March 19, 2009 at 4:58 am

    And so it goes…

    “trouble is a lot of our food lacks the same amount of nutrients it did say 50 years ago”

    One of the most common spins used by the alt med hucksters to peddle overpriced ‘health formulas’.

  3. natalie March 19, 2009 at 6:25 pm

    Scientific Research Proves Raw Food Protects Against Cancer and Heart Disease
    Scientific evidence shows that raw vegan diets decrease toxic products in the colon (From: J Nutr 1992 Apr;122(4):924-30). Shifting from a conventional diet to an uncooked vegan diet reversibly alters fecal hydrolytic activities in humans, according to researchers, Ling WH, and Hanninen O, of the Department of Physiology, University of Kuopio, Finland. Results suggest a raw food uncooked extreme vegan diet causes a decrease in bacterial enzymes and certain toxic products that have been implicated in colon cancer risk.
    Researchers have also found that a diet rich in raw vegetables lowers your risk of breast cancer, and eating lots of fruit reduces your risk for colon cancer, according to a study published in the May 1998 issue of the journal Epidemiology. Including fresh fruit as part of your daily diet has been associated with fewer deaths from heart attacks and related problems, by as much as 24%, according to a study published in the September 1996 issue of the British Medical Journal.
    see the webpage below for the full article
    http://rogerhaeske.com/?page_id=324

    I am NOT suggesting a vegan diet is suitbale for anyone/everyone, just simply providing “some” scientific evidence which supports the claims that our food is significantly depleted in nutrients then it was 50 years ago…

    and also

    http://www.zoeliving.com/Soil_Mineral_Depletion_s/53.htm

    “One of the most common spins used by the alt med hucksters to peddle overpriced ‘health formulas’”

    cannot agree anymore that the majority of supplements on supermarket shelves are riddled with synthetics and sugar and are heavily over marketed
    that doesn’t make this information invalid or “spin”

  4. beatis March 19, 2009 at 6:35 pm

    just simply providing “some” scientific evidence which supports the claims that our food is significantly depleted in nutrients then it was 50 years ago…

    Some say it is, others say it isn’t.

    What I don’t understand though: the plants need these nutrients to grow. Grow they do, but apparently they lack nutrients. What makes them grow then?

    But why do you bring this up? Have we ever denied the merits of a healthy lifestyle?

  5. natalie March 19, 2009 at 6:57 pm

    Beatis… I was simply responding to evenarsenicisnatural

    that’s why I brought it up… you always ask for scientific research, so instead of giving an “ignorant” response, I found something…

    This isn’t promoting any “magic” drug or potion its just scientific research

    “Sometimes life is really simple: just eat your fruit’n veggies, some wholegrain bread, glass of low-fat milk, bit of yoghurt, some fish, some meat, some wine – and bob’s your uncle. No need for supplements, you can spend the money on your weekly bunch of flowers from now on. ”

    according to the scientific research, the above comment may not necessarily be that simple

    “What I don’t understand though: the plants need these nutrients to grow. Grow they do, but apparently they lack nutrients. What makes them grow then?”

    Maybe ask the author of the paper?

    but despite us lacking nutrients and minerals, humans still grow don’t we? doesn’t mean we grow up being healthy…

  6. beatis March 19, 2009 at 7:00 pm

    I don’t think there is much harm in taking a vitamin and mineral supplement and for some groups it can be very sensible, eg elderly people or people who are recovering from a serious illness. But that doesn’t mean that you should overdo it. A vitamin and mineral supplement that provides 100% of the RDA (Recommended Daily Allowances) should be sufficient. I don’t believe in the need for the intake of massive amounts of all kinds of supplements. In fact, I don’t think that’s a very good idea, because a number of vitamins can be detrimental to your health when you take too much of them. Vitamins are not by definition harmless.

  7. beatis March 19, 2009 at 7:09 pm

    The study was supposed to find out if intake of vitamin supplements would decrease the chance of developing cancer and other health problems like heart failure. As it turned out, vitamin supplementation had no effect. There have been a number of studies and they all gave the same outcome. So a healthy diet should suffice. You can take a vitamin supplement if you want to, but apparently there is no need to for extreme intake of supplements.

  8. beatis March 19, 2009 at 7:17 pm

    but despite us lacking nutrients and minerals, humans still grow don’t we? doesn’t mean we grow up being healthy…

    There’s no denying that. :-)

  9. Pingback: Topics about Vitamins » Vitamins and cancer - and other ailments « Anax blog

  10. jli April 2, 2009 at 3:15 pm

    I think the last part of the post is important too. It said:

    I don’t believe in the need for the intake of massive amounts of all kinds of supplements. In fact, I don’t think that’s a very good idea, because a number of vitamins can be detrimental to your health when you take too much of them. Vitamins are not by definition harmless.

    Some of the risks in excessive intake of vitamins are described at http://www.unu.edu/unupress/food/8F102e/8F102E04.htm
    Examples of actual harm to people are described at http://whatstheharm.net/vitaminmegadoses.html

  11. beatis April 2, 2009 at 4:29 pm

    Jli,
    There are some truly horrible examples on Whatstheharm of the dangers of overdoing vitamin intake! I think many people don’t realize that it’s not just a case of “the more the better” when it comes to vitamins. There needs to be a balance here, as in everything.

  12. Rich April 7, 2009 at 7:41 pm

    Men who consume 800 mg of vitamin c, live an average of 6 years longer than those who take the rda of 60 mg, studies show.

    Selenium is one of the neater vitamins. Many studies show that higher selenium in the diet reduces the risk of particular cancers: breast, lung, and prostate; and overall cancer incidence as well.

    For instance, here is a study on Japanese vs. American diet, plus additional selenium vs. cancer.
    http://www.springerlink.com/content/q68411l8l42j572j/

  13. beatis April 7, 2009 at 8:14 pm

    Rich,

    You must be careful with translating effets in mice to people. It’s happens not infrequently that effects in humans are quite different than in mice.

  14. beatis April 7, 2009 at 8:18 pm

    @ Rich,

    Something very strange happened here, and now one of your comments has gone. Could you please post it again?
    And we would like to see the links as well! :-)

    Thanks!

  15. Rich April 8, 2009 at 4:52 pm

    “effects in humans are quite different than in mice.”
    — Absolutely. There is no silver bullet here. That japanese diet vs. american diet is somewhat interesting, though, as the japanese live longer, are skinnier, less heart disease, less cancer overall, and less lung cancer despite smoking twice as much as us.

    http://www.kidon.com/smoke/percentages.htm
    http://www.nationmaster.com/country/ja-japan/hea-health
    http://www.nationmaster.com/country/us-united-states/hea-health

    Singling out one single mineral is not fair as well. The japanese have higher omega-3’s from the fish, and Magnesium, Iodine and Selenium from the Kelp. Could some of these be potential factors in the health disparity between the us and japan? Maybe, or maybe not.

    It is also known that japanese that move to the US have health statistics like americans, and so it would appear that diet may indeed play a role.

    However, exposure to toxins and carcinogens may also be different, so it is interesting to see a controlled animal study.

  16. Rich April 8, 2009 at 5:26 pm

    The chemistry behind nutrition, vitamins, and cancer is tremendously complex. I don’t pretend to believe I have any answers as far as the chemistry. If it was simple, it would have been cured a long time ago. There are a bunch of pro-selenium studies, and some negative ones as well. And the form of Selenium may matter as well. 3 common forms are (Sodium Selenite, Sodium Selenate, and Selenomethionine).

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Selenium
    Controversial health effects – Cancer
    Several studies have suggested a possible link between cancer and selenium deficiency,[25][26][27][28] In 2009 the 5.5 year SELECT study reported that selenium and vitamin E supplementation, both alone and together, did not significantly reduce the incidence of prostate cancer in 35,000 well-nourished men.[29] One earlier study, known as the NPC, was conducted to test the effect of selenium supplementation on the recurrence of skin cancers on selenium-deficient men. It did not demonstrate a reduced rate of recurrence of skin cancers, but did show a reduced occurrence of total cancers, although without a statistically significant change in overall mortality.[30] The preventative effect was greatest in those with the lowest baseline selenium levels.[29] The SELECT trial found that vitamin E did not reduce prostrate cancer as it had in the Alpha-Tocopherol, Beta Carotene (ATBC) study, but the ATBC had a large percentage of smokers while the SELECT trial did not.[29]
    Dietary selenium prevents chemically induced carcinogenesis in many rodent studies.[31] It has been proposed that selenium may help prevent cancer by acting as an antioxidant or by enhancing immune activity.
    Not all studies agree on the cancer-fighting effects of selenium. One study of naturally occurring levels of selenium in over 60,000 participants did not show a significant correlation between those levels and cancer.[32] The SU.VI.MAX study[33] concluded that low-dose supplementation (with 120 mg of ascorbic acid, 30 mg of vitamin E, 6 mg of beta carotene, 100 µg of selenium, and 20 mg of zinc) resulted in a 30% reduction in the incidence of cancer and a 37% reduction in all-cause mortality in males, but did not get a significant result for females.[34] However, there is evidence that selenium can help chemotherapy treatment by enhancing the efficacy of the treatment, reducing the toxicity of chemotherapeutic drugs, and preventing the body’s resistance to the drugs.[35] Studies of cancer cells in vitro showed that chemotherapeutic drugs, such as Taxol and Adriamycin, were more toxic to strains of cancer cells grown in culture when selenium was added.[36] [37]
    In March 2009, a study from the Department of Cancer Biology at the University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center reports that Vitamin E (400 IU) and selenium (200 micrograms) supplements affect gene expression and can act as a tumor suppressor.[38] Eric Klein, MD from the Glickman Urological and Kidney Institute in Ohio said the new study “lend credence to the previous evidence that selenium and vitamin E might be active as cancer preventatives”.[39] In an attempt to rationalise the differences between epidemiological and in vitro studies and randomised trials like SELECT, Klein said that randomized controlled trials “do not always validate what we believe biology indicates and that our model systems are imperfect measures of clinical outcomes in the real world”.[40]

    Ongoing study:
    http://dcp.cancer.gov/programs-resources/groups/ns/fundops/ca04004c
    “For over 25 years, selenium has been shown to be effective in preventing cancer in animal models, and human epidemiological

    and supplementation studies have suggested this essential trace element is effective in human as well. The mechanism of

    action, however, remains unknown. Selenium is a component of several dozen proteins in mammals, and recent genetic data has

    indicated that allelic variants of at least two selenoproteins are associated with cancer risk and/or etiology.”

    New study against Selenium(Select study)(l-selenomethionine – 200 µg/day):
    http://www.cancer.gov/newscenter/pressreleases/SELECTQandA

  17. beatis April 8, 2009 at 5:27 pm

    Hi Rich,

    I read about the Japanese diet the other day and the beneficial elements in it. There also was information on diet and cancer on Cancer Research UK. It seems however that Japanse have more stomach cancer, due to the amounts of salt in their food.

  18. beatis April 8, 2009 at 5:40 pm

    Hi Rich,

    This site might interest you: http://canceranddiet.nl/
    The owner of the site collects scientific information about the relationship between diet and cancer and he has already collected a huge amount of information. His e-mailaddress is on his site, so you can concact him, should you want to.

  19. Rich April 8, 2009 at 7:43 pm

    Since I said that the form of Selenium may matter, I found a prior animal study comparing the effects of two different forms of Selenium on cancer (This study seems to confirm the results of the Select study on Selenomethionine)(which is the most common Selenium supplement).

    The Anticancer Effect of Selenium-enriched Ramps
    http://lpi.oregonstate.edu/f-w99/selenium.html

    *****
    “This site might interest you”
    — I appreciate the link. Thank you very much.

  20. beatis September 27, 2009 at 6:59 am

    @ Juan Batista:

    When you substantiate your claim with some decent evidence, we will post your comment. Until then it will be held in moderation.

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